blog_iStock_000017819095_SMALL

The Innovation Blog

Jay Terwilliger

Recent Posts

Two models for evaluating early innovation

Posted by Jay Terwilliger on April 5, 2011

Last week on this blog I posted "The "SNIFF" test - criteria for early innovation decision making".  This is a simple, but effective five criteria model for evaluating concepts early in the innovation process. Recently I had the pleasure of attending a workshop led by Jay Paap.  Dr. Paap is the founder of Paap Associates, Inc (PAI), and has been consulting to major companies in the field of innovation for 40 years. In his work, he has also dealt with the issue of client companies seeking to apply metrics or find some other useful criteria for making early stage decisions in innovation, and has a slightly different, but intriguingly similar model to offer.

Read More

Topics: Innovation criteria, Innovation, Innovation Metrics, criteria for innovation, decision-making, technical innovation, criteria, innovation decision-making

Wake Up Your Creative Side

Posted by Jay Terwilliger on September 3, 2010

The single biggest myth about creative thinking is that creativity is a gift bestowed upon some people but not others.  We are socialized to believe that there are creative types and non-creative types.  According to a recent Nesweek article The Creativity Crisis, research shows that for the first time American creativity is declining.  The article discusses how our educational system is not
only failing to teach creative thinking to children, but actually stamping their creativity out. Given that the American economy is built on innovation, this is deeply troubling news for the future of business.  Fortunately, creative thinking is a skill that can be flexed and developed just like any other muscle.

The idea that creative thinking is not a natural talent but rather a skill that can be taught is not a new one.  Alex Osborn, known as the “Father of Modern Brainstorming,” was the “O” in the world-renowned advertising agency, BBDO in the mid-1900’s.  As a businessman involved in the business of applied creativity, he sought to learn how creative thinking happened and if it could be broken down into teachable principles.  To learn, he observed the behaviors and techniques of the creative staff of his agency.

In 1948, he published Your Creative Power, presenting the technique of brainstorming. In the 1950’s, along with Sidney Parnes, he developed the Osborn-Parnes Creative Problem Solving Process (CPS) and cofounded the Creative Problem Solving Institute (CPSI), the world's longest running international creativity conference.

His work, along with many others since, has dispelled the Myth of Creativity.  While it is true that many people have a natural talent for creative thinking, the skills and techniques that they use naturally are teachable.  Anyone can become more creative in their thinking and Creative Realities is here to help.

Over the next 10 weeks, The Innovationists will share skills, techniques, and tools that will help you develop your ability to think creatively "on-demand."

Read More

Topics: creativity, myth of creativity, creative thinking, brainstorming, creative thinking skills